The Garage Sale seems to have been a good success. There are still some great values and we have added more items, including nearly-new demo product this week. I was happy to see that the motorcycle tour sold to a couple of lucky folks. Grace and Tony are organizing the ride and we hope to get it in before I leave for the far east. You don’t have to twist my arm to get me to twist the throttle this time of the year so I hope that we can do it one of these next few days!
I thought I would share our team operating principles with you. I cannot take credit for this list of guidelines for happy working as I stole them from my friend Pat Heffernan but they are a very useful reminder about how to create a great work environment!
*Demonstrate Gentleness, Dignity and Respect*
*Communicate with Frankness, Honesty and Clarity*
*Avoid Blame and Pettiness*
*Keep Agreements*
*Assume Good Intentions in Others*
*Listen and Be Receptive*
*Ask for Help*
*Avoid Taking Things Personally*
*Take Risks and Learn from What Doesn’t Work*
*Take Ownership for Outcomes*
*Attack Problems Not People and Seek Solutions*
*Do it All with Enthusiasm and Joy*
*Seek Ways to Help Others*
Thank you so much for reading Kibbles & Bytes!
Your Kibbles & Bytes team,
_Don, Kali & Ed_

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We’re bundling all three models of the new iPod touch with AppleCare at a $25 discount. This is an ideal bundle if you’re giving the iPod touch as a gift, especially if it’s to someone who’s never owned an iPod or iPod touch.
That’s because AppleCare for the iPod touch extends hardware protection coverage and telephone technical support to two years from the date of iPod purchase. It covers the iPod and included accessories (battery, earphones, other accessories in the iPod box). Other benefits of AppleCare for iPod touch:
* AppleCare representatives can help troubleshoot your iPod and its connection with iTunes.
* Apple offers the same complete service for both Mac and Windows users.
* Offers award-winning technical support
* Provides a convenient toll-free telephone number
* Guarantees genuine Apple replacement parts
* Permits transfer of the plan between owners
“Click here to see all iPod touch models, including the new models and the now-discounted previous-generation iPod touch!”:http://www.smalldog.com/category/x/x/x/Apple|iPod_touch

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Apple released iTunes 9 two weeks ago to much acclaim. iTunes 9 introduced some huge improvements and new features to the player we already know and love, including Home Sharing and iPhone/iPod touch app management. (“Read our overview here.”:http://blog.smalldog.com/kibbles/?c=kb637)
Along with a new categorization structure, we can also now do what I’ve wanted to be able to do since iTunes’ inception–sort by Artist in the first column. (Why would I want to view by song first if I’m going to sort by artist anyway??)
While, I couldn’t have been happier about that, I quickly discovered that my reliable green minimize button NO LONGER produced the Mini Player. I figured it must have been a mistake–why would Apple do something like that after all this time? Pressing the Option key in addition to the green button wasn’t __that__big of a deal, but seriously…
Turns out, I wasn’t the only one annoyed by that, and Apple did a Mini Player about-face with the 9.0.1 update–the green ‘minimize’ feature is back. Now I can go back to obsessing about my Album Art and direct my outrage elsewhere. Or as they say, “keep calm and carry on.”:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keep_Calm_and_Carry_On
We’ll be writing more about the features of iTunes 9 in future issues; to download it, check for updates in iTunes or click the following:
“iTunes 9 for Mac and PC”:http://www.apple.com/itunes/download/ (it’s free, of course.)

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A few weeks ago in our “Tech Tails”:http://blog.smalldog.com/techtails publication I “wrote about”:http://blog.smalldog.com/techtails/?c=tt676 how much I love using “Mac HelpMate”:http://www.machelpmate.com/ to consult with clients remotely. It’s an application that allows us to control our client’s machine while we speak with them over the phone about their issues. This has been a great tool for both troubleshooting and training.
This week I had a great opportunity to help a client with the help of “Mac HelpMate”:http://www.machelpmate.com/ that ended up saving her a lot of money, and saving me a lot of driving time. A few months ago I had gone to a customer’s home in southern Vermont for a lesson and to install Microsoft Office 2008. All seemed to have gone well until she contacted me a couple weeks ago asking about upgrading to Snow Leopard and she also let me know that since my visit, her attachments wouldn’t open in her email program. She told me that she had to drag the attachment to her Desktop and then open it, which had become an arduous process. She blamed the Office install.
I explained that installing the new version of Office should not affect her attachments in an email program, as I personally had never run into that before. I offered to help her over the phone, but she wanted visual help. The problem was that the client lives far away. Our minimum bill-time for an on-sight consult is one hour, plus we bill a small mileage fee and she lives about three hours away round trip. Since her issue probably wouldn’t take more than 20-30 minutes to resolve, I felt that it made more sense to try a remote consult. She was wary of the idea at first, but agreed that the price sounded much sweeter, so she agreed to try it.
About two minutes into the remote consult we discovered the problem. My client is using Thunderbird for her email client. I’ll admit that I don’t have much experience with Thunderbird; my expertise lies in Apple Mail and Entourage. When my client clicked on a Word or Excel-formatted email attachment, a dialogue box appeared saying that Thunderbird had not been told what application to use for that document. The message went on to explain that we needed to go to the Preferences and tell it which application to use for each file type. Sure enough, I opened Thunderbird’s Preferences, navigated to attachments and was able to tell it which application to use for each file-type. Voila; worked like a charm! The client was thrilled with the experience!
While we try to anticipate any issues when going into a consult, there are occasionally surprises. Most mail applications easily find the application that would open each extension type. Thunderbird is unique in the sense that it was not able to open attachments on its own without having the preferences specifically configured for each file type. This left the client frustrated for months until she called for help. Luckily, we had a system like “Mac HelpMate”:http://www.machelpmate.com/ that allowed us to offer a remote solution instead of charging her for a full-fledged consulting visit.
“Mac HelpMate”:http://www.machelpmate.com/ has really opened up our consulting possibilities. I’ve had the pleasure of helping clients as far away as The Netherlands and on a variety of internet connections including satellite and 3G (though I wouldn’t personally try it over dial-up).
Give it a try! We offer remote consults for $54.99 per half-hour. *Call in the next two weeks, mention you saw this article in Kibbles & Bytes and get the first remote session for only $39.* Give us a ring at *802-496-7171 ×512* or *email* “consulting@smalldog.com”:mailto:consulting@smalldog.com to set up an appointment.

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We always know a new Apple product is going to popular when a large number of Small Dog Electronics employees decide to buy it for themselves. The new iPod nano with built-in video camera, microphone, pedometer, and FM radio is a perfect example of this. And in case you’re wondering, green is the most popular color.
I recently tested the video from the new nano against a Flip minoHD. In some ways, this isn’t a fair comparison. The Flip is a dedicated video camera, and shoots in HD with a wide 1280 x 720 aspect ratio. The video camera in the nano isn’t really intended to replace a dedicated video camera; it’s there to capture spontaneous, fun videos. It captures standard def. video at a 640 x 480 resolution. The nano also features 15 built-in special effects like X-Ray, Security Cam, Cyborg, and Kaleido, which further accentuate the fun factor. Still, I thought the video from the nano looked surprisingly decent.
I basically attached the two cameras with rubber bands and walked around Small Dog. Video here is shown side by side. All audio comes directly from the nano, not the Flip. Neither the Flip nor the nano has a particularly outstanding microphone.
Of course these videos are ultra-compressed by the time they’re posted online. Don’t forget to watch in HD!
“Click here to see the video on YouTube.”:http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pB76K8hHMqA
“Click here to see the video in a larger size in better quality on Vimeo.”:http://vimeo.com/6728321

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This is our 100th Mac Treat. It took us slightly over two years to reach this milestone. Mac OS X has thousands of features–many that aren’t obvious to new and even experienced Mac users. We started posting short Mac Treats to reveal and explain these features, as well as to promote best Mac practices. We want to make it easier and more fun to use your Mac, both for creative tasks as well as everyday computer-related chores.
However, our main goal with Mac Treats is to provide the “a ha!” and “I didn’t know you could do that!” moments that come from owning a Mac. Here are my 10 most-used, favorite Mac treats.
*#1* *The King of All Keyboard Shortcuts*
After the essential keyboard shortcuts (Command-C for copy, Command-X for cut, Command-V for paste, Command-S for save, Command-shift-; to check spelling) this is the keyboard shortcut I use more than any other. It’s a trick for jumping quickly between active applications.
Hold down the Command and Tab key at the same time. You will see a large bar in the middle of your screen with all active applications. To jump between the foremost application, simply continue holding down the Command key while tapping the Tab key. This is a super fast way to hop between applications.
You can combine other shortcuts with tab-command. For example, you can use Tab-Command to quickly cut and paste text between applications (as long as they are running) such as TextEdit, Word, Pages, Mail, etc. Or, you can instantly quit applications by shift-tabbing to the application you want to quit, then (without letting go of the command key) use the Command-Q shortcut. I use this combination all the time to quit applications.
Note that the Command key is found to the left of the spacebar on Mac keyboards. On laptops it’s often stamped with an Apple or an icon that looks like a little four-leafed clover.
*#2* *Easier Renaming of Files and Folders*
In the Finder, quickly change a folder or file’s name by clicking on it once to highlight it, then click on the Return key. The title of the file or folder will be now be editable.
*#3* *Efficiently Select Multiple Files*
Here are two easy keyboard shortcuts for selecting multiple folders or files at a time. These shortcuts work in most OS X applications, including Address Book, Mail, iTunes, and iPhoto. I use these shortcuts while scrolling through iPhoto to quickly select photos for a photo album. In iTunes, I use these shortcuts to quickly make a music playlist.
To choose a sequential series of files, folders, photos, songs, etc from a larger list or group of files, click one on the first file you want, hold down the Shift key, then click on the last file at the end of the list. All files in between will be highlighted. You can drag and drop the highlighted files or even move them to the trash. This is also how you can highlight blocks of text.
If you want to pick and choose non-sequential files or folders out of a larger group, simply hold down the Command key while selecting files. The selected files will be highlighted. Again, you can drag and drop these highlighted files or move them to the trash.
*#4* *Easy Maintenance – Clear that Desktop!*
Did you know that having many folders, images, old installers, and other files on your OS X desktop can cramp your Mac’s performance, including start-up time? This is because desktop images are treated like dynamic windows, rather than static images.
Ideally, the OS X desktop should only be used for temporary, short term storage. It’s best to keep all your files stored in their proper locations, as much a possible–documents in the Documents folder, photos and images in iPhoto or the Pictures folder, etc.
You can keep a catch-all folder in your Home Directory, or Documents folder, where you simply stash everything. You can drag that catch-all folder into your dock, where it is always easily accessible.
*#5* *Match Font Styles in Copy and Paste*
Typically when you copy text from one document or application and paste it into a new document or application, the original font, font size, and font color is preserved, possibly clashing with the formating of the new document.
However, for many Mac applications (Pages, Mail, TextEdit) there is a simple way to force the copied text to match the font of document it’s being pasted into. After copying text, navigate to the Menu bar at the top of the screen, click on Edit, and choose “Paste and Match Style” from the drop down menu.
If you prefer to use a keyboard shortcut to paste your text , hold down the following keys at the same time: Command-Option-Shift-V.
*#6* *Silence the Quack*
You’ve probably noticed that when you adjust the audio volume on your Mac, there is a quacking or clicking sound accompanying the action. This sound can be very annoying, especially when you’re wearing headphones. Fortunately, on most Macs it’s easy to silence the quack: simply hold down your Mac’s Shift key while adjusting the volume. Voilà; no quack.
*#7* *Subscribe to Free, Useful Calenders With iCal*
One feature in iCal I’ve always enjoyed is the availability of free, easy-to-download iCal-compatible calenders. These calenders cover a wide range of topics, including astronomical events, sporting schedules, national and international holidays, school schedules, music tour dates, and many more.
You can find public, shared calendars at Apple’s website “by clicking here”:http://www.apple.com/downloads/macosx/calendars/. You can also find over 2400 downloadable iCal ready calenders on “iCalshare”:http://icalshare.com by clicking here. However, many of the calenders on iCalshare.com are out of date.
I usually just use Google to find iCal calenders. For example, I was looking for the Red Sox schedule and simply Googled “Red Sox iCal.” That brought me directly to a Red Sox page that lists three different iCal compatible calenders.
Once I subscribe to these calenders, I can then sync and share them on all my Macs and my iPhone with MobileMe.
*#8* *Forward Delete on a Mac*
If you use the Delete key on almost any Mac, the cursor travels backwards, erasing the words behind it. However, the Apple Pro keyboard, and many other third party keyboards have a dedicated forward Delete key. It is positioned over the the four arrow keys on the extended Apple Pro keyboard, between the letter portion of the keyboard and the number pad. It is printed with a right-pointing arrow with an “x” in it, and it may also say “del.”
Apple notebooks, Apple bluetooth keyboards, and the non-extended Apple keyboard that ships with newer iMacs don’t have a dedicated forward delete key. To forward delete on MacBooks, MacBook Pros, and older Apple notebooks, simply hold down the fn key (function key) and press delete. The cursor will gobble up the words in from of it. On MacBooks, MacBook Pros, PowerBooks, and iBooks, the fn key is located on lower left corner of the keyboard, under the shift key.
*#9* *Get in Character*
Ever wonder where those pesky specials characters that aren’t written on your keyboard (e.g. ¢, ©, ®, ™) are when you’re writing? They’re all listed in Character Palette–part of OS X.
Easy access can be found either as a part of your other Apple Apps (such as Mail, TextEdit, Stickies, etc.) or in the International panel of System Preferences. *(System Preferences > International > Input Menu)*
If you find that you use these symbols a fair amount and would like to see them quickly, check the Character Palette checkbox and “Show input menu in menu bar.” The latter will display a little flag icon in the top righthand corner of your menu bar (how patriotic!).
Another tip for finding some symbols that you use more than others is to remember the keyboard shortcuts. Here’s a cheatsheet for my most popular ones:
Accent Acute (´): Option-E; Bullet (•): Option-8; Cent (¢): Option-4; Copyright (©): Option-G; Degree (˚): Option-K; Registered (®): Option-R; Trade Mark (™): Option-2;
And, for Mac users, one we’ve mentioned before and use a lot of: Apple symbol (): Shift-Option-K.
*#10* *Beyond Dragging and Dropping*
On a Mac, if you think you should be able to drag and drop a file or folder from one application into another, you probably can. For example: if you keep Dictionary in your dock, you can select a word and drag it onto the Dictionary icon for a definition. Drag any amount of selected text to the Mail icon, and Mail will pop open a new message with that text inserted. Select any text, drag it to Safari, and Safari will search Google for the selected text.
Create instant bookmarks in Safari by dragging a link into your Bookmarks bar. Create an instant shortcut to a webpage in Safari by highlighting the URL (address) and dragging the text to your Mac’s desktop. This creates a link on your desktop–double click it and Safari will bring you directly to the webpage. Save an image from the internet by dragging it out of Safari and dropping it on your Mac’s desktop.
Select any text, drag it to Stickies, and you’ll have a new Sticky with the selected text. Select any text and drag it to Font Book, and it will create a library with the selected font. If you drag selected text while holding the Option key, it will be copied where you drop it–not moved. Drag and drop CD/DVD burning. Pop a blank CD or DVD into your optical drive. Drag files onto the CD or DVD’s icon. Drag it to the trash and you’ll be asked if you want to burn the disk or simply eject it. You’ll also have the opportunity to name the disc.
“Looking for other Mac Treats? Take a look in our archives!”:http://blog.smalldog.com/kibbles/

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_Dear Friends,_
Someone told me many years ago to never start a letter out with an apology, but I have to make an exception for this issue of Kibbles & Bytes. Actually, I have a couple of apologies to make. First of all, we have not gotten our Kibbles & Bytes mailings right for about six consecutive weeks. We discovered, with your help, that customers were getting multiple copies of our newsletter and sometimes up to six copies or more. So, I would walk down to Mark’s desk and scream, yell and pound my fist on his litter-strewn desk and he would assure me that he was going to fix it.
Okay, it took a couple more weeks, but we finally figured out how to get you just one copy but that next issue somehow didn’t get out to the entire mailing list. Mark made a big mistake because I was one of the people that didn’t get my copy. More bouncing litter on his desk. He figured that one out and the next two issues of Kibbles went to everyone, but then I got messages from many of you that the newsletter was coming through in raw HTML and not displaying properly. I am happy to report (with both fingers and toes crossed) that I think we have solved all of these problems and you should only get one copy this week (and it will display properly). I really apologize for this unprofessional email mess and we pledge to keep it fixed. Please let me know if there are any repeated problems!
My other apology is even more embarrassing. In my rush to write my introduction to Kibbles last week, I got a bit sloppy and had a senior moment when I confused Rosh Hashanah and Passover. Trust me, I really do know the difference and my mother immediately called me to scold me as soon as she got her copy of Kibbles. Yes, it was Rosh Hashanah last week; no seder, but one of the high holy days for Jews. The other is Monday (Sunday eve) when we celebrate Yom Kippur or the day of atonement. I guess I have some atoning to do!
There are signs of fall all around these days. The leaves are rapidly changing and falling with some of the nicest fall foliage in years. I take the long way on back roads to work these days and it is simply beautiful. Yesterday, as I passed the Neil farm, there was a whole rafter of wild turkeys grazing in the newly harvested corn field. The most noticeable sign of fall for me is that it is now dark when I get up and I am up before the dogs most days. Artie’s iChat status is predicting snow on the mountain tops by next week, but I’m pretty skeptical. I do remember that one year on Art’s wedding anniversary/Autumn’s birthday–October 3rd–there was accumulation of snow up on Prickly Mountain and the brilliant fall colors were highlighted by white snow. I hope that it holds off a little more! The field mice are also starting to seek warmer quarters and I noticed that they have been chowing down on my cat Mothra’s food.
We have gotten stock of all of the new iPods and I have to say that the new iPod nano is the coolest iPod yet. Apple has hit a homer with this new version. Be sure to check out Ed’s comparison between the video on the new nano versus the HD Flip camera below.

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